7 Old Time Survival Skills Your Grandfather Knew That Could Help You Today

As early as fifty or sixty years ago, whether we realize it or not, modern society was learning basic survival skills. On any given weekend a boy usually could be found under the hood of the car with his Dad, changing plugs or replacing a battery.

There was raking and mowing to be done, wood to be chopped and/or piled up near the house. These days nearly all those skills can be hired out and often times they are.

The older generation were far more self-reliant then those of today. Pretty much everyone knew the basics of carpentry, growing plants, or even knew some basic metal work.

It was also a more agriculturally based society. There were very few women, unless they lived in the big city, who did not have a garden in the backyard.

There are many skills that are taken for granted these days that our grand-parents saw as normal when they were a young man and woman. It’s time to go back and take a look at some of those old fashion ideals that can aid a modern day survivalist.

It’s unfortunate, but most of us have limited finances, space and time when it comes to getting prepared. The few minutes daydreaming about an arsenal in the basement, with tens of thousands of rounds of ammunition can be a brief reprise from the humdrum of the day, but it is only a daydream.

It is nice to fantasize about opening the door to an underground bunker to find rows of shelving weighted down with food, blankets,medical supplies, protective suits and masks and full water barrels by the hundreds lining the walls. In your mind and the mind of most people you cannot have too much when it comes to prepping, but again space is limited, and money is always in short supply and time, there is never enough time.

What Can Be Done

In reality if you do not have it, cannot make it, or trade for it during a crisis then you will have to survive without it, if you can. This means you not only need a supply on hand, you need the ability to produce life essentials or be able to barter for them.

Skills will be in demand during a crisis so do an assessment of what skills you have that can be used in trade. Everyone has skills, and it is never too late to learn some more.

Are you ready to turn back the clocks to the 1800’s for up to three years? Our grandfathers and great-grandfathers were the last generation to practice the basic things that we call survival skills now… WATCH THIS VIDEO and you will find many interesting things!  Click on the image bellow and learn more about Survival things that we lost to history.

  • 1. How to make snare trap

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1. The simple snare trap consists of a noose that is placed over a trail or a den hole and connected to a stake. The noose must be large enough to allow the animal’s head  to pass through; as the “victim’s” head moves through the snare, the noose will tighten around its neck and as the animal fights to get loose, the snare will strangle it.

It sounds very simple, but it’s extremely effective in the right situations.

You can improve your chance of success by baiting the trap, thus drawing the animal towards it. As bait, you should use a food source that is not abundant in the area, yet the animal is familiar with.

Using bait when fishing isn’t an option if you want to catch one. A great bait for small mammals is peanut butter (from a MRE ration for example). When using bait, you can use “samples” to attract the animal’s attention, by scattering little bits around the trap.

  • 2. How to make foolproof traps

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Cold weather can wreak havoc on your trapping activities, freezing triggers shut and imprisoning footholds in frozen dirt beds. But there are a few ways that the cold can help us, whether you are trapping as a pastime or trapping for food during a wilderness emergency.

Patrick Shelley – who earned a living in the woods for years on end will show you how to make foolproof traps. He wrote an awesome chapter about how to trap different animals in winter just like our forefathers. When 100 hungry mouths will shoot each other over the last deer to feed their children, your family can eat the favorite food of trappers and mountain men from the 1800s.

 

  • 3. How To Preserve Your Meat

Smoke has the same effect as salt of keeping away bacteria from your meat. It also gives it a very tasty flavor which is why it is still used today.

If you know of a smokehouse near you, you can take it there, you will save time. If not, you can do the process yourself, but you will need a smoker. The good news is that they are available in all kinds of shapes and sizes, and use various fuels such as propane or charcoal. You can also modify grills or ovens to work as smokers, but the use of a regular smoker for this purpose is recommended.

This method is similar to grilling the meat and will generate a lot of smoke, so it needs to be done outdoors. However, grilling is a quick cooking process that uses high heat, while smoking takes much longer and uses indirect heat at low tempesmoking meatratures. The temperature should be anywhere between 150 and 225 degrees Fahrenheit.

This process is known as hard smoking and it is a way of cooking your meat in a way that will not require refrigeration. The end product will look similar to jerky.

Cold smoking is also available, and uses much lower temperatures below 100 degrees Fahrenheit. This method is only used for flavoring the meat rather than actually cooking it.

  • 4. Dry Canning Using Vacuum Sealers

Did you know that you can use your vacuum sealer to seal dried foods in mason jars? Well, now you do. You can get a jar sealer for your vacuum sealer and suck all of the air right out. The jar will seal and you’ll be good to go. This isn’t great for powdery substances but is OK for foods such as beans, pasta, etc. The powdery stuff gunks up your machine.

One word of warning here: this is a good method if you’re just shooting for storage of foods such as flour that you don’t really have to worry about spoiling, but it doesn’t necessarily get enough air out to prevent the growth of mold. You need less than .02% oxygen for that and there’s not really any way to know how much oxygen is left in the jar with vacuum sealers.

Many people assume that as long as the jar is sealed, the food is safe, and usually that’s correct but there’s always that one-in-a-thousand chance that it’s not. Oxygen absorbers, when used as directed, take oxygens levels down to about .01 percent.

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  • 5. How To Dry Your Ingredients

First things first. In order to use your ingredients, you can dry them and there are a few different ways to do this. Drying is a great way to store them long-term, though most of them lose their efficacy and flavor slowly over time.

Simply harvest your ingredients and let them dry in a warm, dry spot out of the sun, or in the dehydrator or oven. Regardless of which method you choose, make sure that they’re in a single layer so that they dry evenly. If layered, they may mold before they dry, especially if you’re drying them naturally.

Wash them off to remove any dust or bugs. If you’re drying them naturally cover them with a paper towel to keep them clean while they’re drying. Let them dry completely until they crumble because moisture will cause them to mold. If you’re using the oven, do so at about 200 degrees or so.

You want them to dry but not burn, and you don’t want to cook them because you want to preserve the natural goodness in them, not bake them all out.

Once you’ve dried them, you need to store them in an air-tight container. If you won’t be using them within a few months, you can always vacuum seal them to extend storage time.

If you choose to dry the entire plant, you can dry it using the same methods as above or you can hang them upside down in a warm, dry spot out of the sun. You can also dry citrus rinds. They’re rich in vitamin C and add a nice flavor. Just grate the zest off and dry as stated above.

In addition to leaves, you can use the berries, roots, bark, seeds, stems and flowers of many plants too, using the same methods. It just depends on what the recipe, or your personal preference, calls for.

To take drying a step further, you may want to powder it. Simply grind the herb into a fine powder either by hand or using a coffee grinder

  • 6. Rediscovering the art of poultice

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We would do well to reinstate the ancient art of poulticing as a valued healing tool in the modern herbal renaissance. As practitioners become more involved in providing therapy as well as dispensing herbal prescriptions, the line between clinical herbal therapist and folk practitioner will blur, with or without the approval of the orthodox health care community.

There is no need to wait for “scientific validation” when we have recorded over three thousand years of proven efficacy in traditional healing practices all around the world.

 

From Susan Morrow, an ex-science teacher and chemist, you’ll master “The Art of Poultice.” She says, “If you really explore the ingredients from which our forefathers made poultices, you’ll be totally surprised by the similarities with modern medicines.” Well…how would you feel in a crisis to be the only one from the group knowledgeable about this lost skill? When there are no more antibiotics, people will turn to you to save their ill children’s lives.

  • 7. How to make a superfood with basic ingredients

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When the white man arrived on the shores of North America, the folks who already lived here had been thriving for hundreds of years, using foodstuffs that were available to them. If we are smart, we might want to explore how they did things and adopt what makes sense today.

The foods they carried with them had to be light, nutritious, and energy dense. Three foods stand out as meeting all these requirements, and they are all something we can make today.

In this video Lex Rooker will show you how to make a superfood with basic ingredients that you can find in any Walmart. This amazing food was invented and largely used by Native American scouts as well as early western explorers who were on their own for months at a time. This nutritious food was light, compact, and high in protein, carbohydrates, and vitamins, and if done properly, it can last anywhere from a few years up to a lifetime without refrigeration! In fact, if you have this food, you don’t need anything else because a person could subsist entirely on this food, drawing on the fat for energy, the protein for strength, and the vitamins for health.

This are just a few skills that  prepares you to deal with worst-case scenarios with the minimum amount of resources just like our forefathers lived their lives, totally independent from electricity, cars, or modern technology whatsoever, which means you’ll also be bulletproof against the ever-increasing threat of an Electro Magnetic Pulse, a Powerful Economic Breakdown, Famines, and Natural Disasters. You’ll have the power to protect and save your family…even to rebuild your community during the worst of times.

What you’ll be getting from The Lost Ways and Claude Davis? His book is about a guide of basic techniques of survival that can help us when disasters occur. Claude is and old-fashioned guy by any standard. He lives with his wife and two children in a log cabin he had built, cooks outside on an open flame in a cauldron most of the time, and all of his clothes are handmade. WATCH THIS VIDEO and you will find many interesting things!  Click on the image bellow and learn more about Survival things that we lost to history.