DIY Project: How to Build a Soda Can Heater

soda-can-heater

It won’t heat your whole house, but it will do a pretty good job keeping your garage, greenhouse, or other small area warm.This is a perfect DIY project for anyone who wants to save a little money on their heating bill.

It is worth making and storing in case the power goes down. You can at least warm up a small room. You could always scale this to maybe double its size, maybe build two or three. This will give you free heat with NO power.

I made a small one of these a few years ago to heat my shed. It works well, even in winter. I made one to keep the shed from completely freezing during the day. Seeing this project has sparked me to make a bigger one and actually mount it on the side of the shed to get more sunlight!

Click here and watch this video “Learn how to produce off-grid power by the end of the day!” How to Slash Your Power Bill by up to 75% (or more) in less than 30 days – Guaranteed!

energy-home

While I have electricity out to the garage now, heat has been an issue all winter long. Mattar graciously lent me his kerosene heater, which did an okay job of taking the bite off the chill. Insulating the garage would go a long way to help keep the bitter Vermont cold out, but that’s a project for another day. I decided instead to take advantage of the south-facing side of the garage and build a solar furnace to collect some of that sunshine just bouncing straight off my garage. My dad built one years ago and said he recorded a 110-degree temperature differential between inlet and outlet. And I had enough scrap materials around the basement to do something similar to what my dad built.

my carpentry skills suck

I started with some 2x4s and plywood to build a simple box. I’m no carpenter, but I learned that if it’s wobbly, just add more nails.

that's a lotta soda

I actually built the box to certain dimensions, based on what scrap materials I had and on the dimensions of my heat collection method – aluminum cans. That sure was a lot of Sprite. Fifty cans in five columns of 10 will funnel the air upward.

caulk fills all holes

Sealed the box using adhesive caulk, just to keep any heated air from escaping the box.

45 cans of soda on the drill, 45 cans of soda...

So you may have already thought, “How can air climb the columns of cans when there’s no hole at the bottom of the can?” Answer: drill press and 3/4-inch bit. Times 45.

doesn't have to be a clean cut

The last five cans, the bases of each column, will sit on the bottom of the box and thus will be unable to draw air from underneath, so I poked holes in the sides of each of the five.

use more caulk than that

Stack the cans with liberal doses of adhesive caulk. Give them enough time to dry.

make sure you're only drilling through wood, not the nails holding the wood together

Once they’re dry, I painted each column with black BBQ paint. Black to best absorb the sun’s heat, BBQ paint to keep from flaking off the cans. At the top, I drilled an outlet hole. I left an inch or two of space between the tops of the columns and the top of the box to permit air to flow out of the columns.

wet-dry vacuum hose - I did buy that

I drilled the outlet hole based on the diameter of some wet-dry vacuum hose I picked up, about 1-1/2 inches in diameter.

don't put it here

At the bottom, I used another wet-dry vacuum attachement that would more evenly disperse the incoming air. Screwed it in at each end, then caulked the seal.

keep your columns straight

Then started to caulk the columns in place. At the bottom, you can see the inlet hole I drilled. At about this point, I realized that a better place for the inlet would have been through the plywood at the bases of each column.

Watch this free video and Learn The World’s Largest Collection of 16000 Woodworking Plans! Watch This Video Till The End To Get Full Access!

teds-banner-600x300

 

In this location, the air can simply pass over the cans (there’s about 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch between the cans and the upper edge of the 2×4 frame) and not really pick up that much heat. If I were to relocate the inlet, it would force all the air to pass through the cans and pick up the absorbed heat. Next time.

I see a red door...

Had some red paint left over from one of Heather’s previous projects, so slapped on a couple coats to at least keep the weather off the bare wood.

not a trick shot

The caulk is pretty strong. Kept the cans from falling out while I had the box inverted.

finally put to good use

Also had some 3/4-inch PVC pipe from another previous project. Bought a couple elbows and T-fittings and whipped up a simple frame to keep the box off the ground and to angle it upward toward the sun. Didn’t give the exact angle too much thought.

sittin' pretty

Caulked a clear plexiglas cover on the front and sat the furnace out in the sun for a full day over the weekend to see how it would work.

need to clean out those leaves

Using some advanced technological equipment, such as this precisely calibrated pyrometer, I determined the intake air temperature, which should have been the same as the ambient air temperature, to be about 80 degrees.

could be better

Using the same equipment and methods, I determined the outlet temperature to be about 95 degrees – thus a 15 degree temperature differential. Not 110 degrees, but not bad , considering I didn’t even break $50 in materials – most of that being the plexiglas window.

Obviously don’t have the inlet and outlet attached to the garage – figures that the day I finish the furnace, it’s 80 degrees and sunny and it looks like we’re finally done with winter. Dad recommends wiring a pusher fan at the end of the inlet tube to keep the air circulating through the furnace.

Were I to do this again, I’d first make the furnace larger. As I recall, Dad’s measured something like four feet on each side. Obviously, the more surface area, the more heat you’ll pick up. Second, as mentioned above, I’d relocate the inlet to the back of the box to direct all the air through the cans. Or at least I’d cut a piece of aluminum to act as a baffle and prevent the air from rising straight up. Third, I might use those small soda cans I’ve seen in the grocery stores lately, just to get more surface area.

Are you ready to turn back the clocks to the 1800’s for up to three years? Our grandfathers and great-grandfathers were the last generation to practice the basic things that we call survival skills now… WATCH THIS VIDEO and you will find many interesting things!

bun the lost

By 

Be the first to comment on "DIY Project: How to Build a Soda Can Heater"

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*